News

My Mental Health In VR – BBC Three

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For the past few months I’ve been making a short series of films that use virtual reality to help express mental health conditions for BBC Three.

The series combines powerful interviews with people with mental health experiences with innovative mixed reality filming using Google’s virtual reality painting tool Tilt Brush.

The project involved brokering deals with Google to use the Tilt Brush technology and YouTube Space London to use their state-of-the-art facilities, as well as taking advice from BBC R&D and mental health charities such as MIND.

The series is available to watch on BBC Three’s YouTube channel, Facebook page, and the BBC Three website.

I’ll be appearing on BBC Breakfast on Friday 22 September on BBC One to talk about the series, so tune in 8-9am!

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Work With Me! Researcher Job At BBC Three

Are you hard-working, enthusiastic, and into making awesome social video? Want to work with me in Birmingham?

Well, BBC Three are looking for a researcher to join our development team in Birmingham. The role will involve helping to make powerful, issues-driven films that make you think and make you laugh.

The ideal candidate will have practical skills in finding stories and contributors, researching topics, filming, and editing, as well as having a passion for what’s possible in the world of social video.

You can apply for the job here: http://careerssearch.bbc.co.uk/jobs/job/Researcher/23035

Good luck!

7 Common Mistakes When Breaking Into TV

This week I got involved in assessing the new batch of BBC Production Apprentices hoping to start their career in media with the beeb. It was a fascinating couple of days, seeing a range of people hoping to get their first step on the ladder.

I saw some great talent and some real potential over the tasks we observed, but one thing has been nagging me since we wrapped up. The basic mistakes we saw over and again during the process of interviews and group assessments.

Here’s a quick list of 7 things I think are essentials that sadly, a lot of hopeful candidates lacked but needn’t have.

  1. Research. The volume of candidates that hadn’t looked up the channel/team they were aiming for was staggering. Do your homework!
  2. Smiling. Not appearing approachable is a problem when you’ll be working in teams and with the public. The very least you can do is smile.
  3. Passion. I get it, you want to appear ‘professional’, but the people who shone were the people who were enthusiastic and excited about working in TV.
  4. Engagement. Research alone isn’t always enough. Immersion and engagement with the content, subjects, and practices is really important.
  5. Experience. You’re not expected to have professional experience. But doing anything you can off your own back is key. Keep it simple and share it.
  6. Teamwork. In group assessments, you really have to be a team player and show it. That means building on others’ ideas, not just showing why you are great.
  7. Expectation. You’re starting at the bottom. That means being useful and flexible. You’re not Scorsese yet.

I don’t think any of the above is unachievable for someone at the start of their careers. You can forgive a lack of technical knowledge or high-level hands on experience – that’s expected – but the points above are basic errors that ultimately cost people places on these sought after schemes and may scupper a career in media altogether.

The good news is, they’re super easy to fix.

Wonder Woman Video Essay

I made a little film for BBC Three about women in film. It’s a mini video essay exploring female representation in movies in light of Wonder Woman’s success around the world.

It certainly stoked some debate as the comment demonstrate and has hit over 250k views which is nice. If anything, it’s highlighted the need for conversation around women’s ability and right to a fair shot in jobs traditionally dominated by men. Filmmaker is not a gendered role.

You can watch and share the video on Facebook here.

Digital Cities – Digital Digbeth Day

I recently did a talk at Digital Digbeth Day as part of Digital Cities, a week-long conference of events hosted by the BBC.

I spoke about the work I’ve been doing in my new role at BBC Three to develop new video formats for social platforms and shared the success we’ve had as a channel in the 12 months since launching as an online-only proposition. All in all, it’s looking very positive for youth broadcasting in the digital era, and levels of engagement are at a peak.

If you couldn’t make it, my main point was that we are constantly iterating when we develop content for young audiences. Platforms, change, habits change, and people’s interests change. But the things that remain constant are the drivers of what makes people recognise something that is a) good and b) they want to share. That’s psychology. And it’s very important to the way we work up new concepts and engage with our audience, not just broadcast at them.

I’m part of BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew

I’m pleased to say I’ve been accepted onto the BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew professional development scheme which gives TV and Film professionals a year of events, masterclasses, and access to exclusive content.

It’s already proving to be a great way to meet new people and gain knowledge. Thanks BFI and BAFTA for having me!

You can see me on a long list of talented folk over on Screen Daily.

A noodley film for BBC Three

I developed and produced a film for BBC Three showing the incredible skills behind traditional handmade noodles. You can watch the short over on BBC Three’s Facebook page.

The film was directed by Craig Bush and with a great team of Theo Gove-Humphries, Pete Styles, Pasquale Tropea, and Isaure de Pontbriand. We used the Phantom Flex4 camera for the super slo-mo shots.